Jack Letts

Jack converted to Islam at the age of 16. He became a devout Muslim and traveled to the Middle East at the age of 18 after seeing the atrocities that were being inflicted on other Muslims under the Assad regime. His motivation for going was humanitarian in nature – he felt his language skills in English and Arabic might prove useful. He wanted be the “best Muslim he could be”. While in Syria, Jack worked against ISIS – risking his life by decrying the terror group as “thugs” and “unIslamic”. His situation grew increasingly perilous and he attempted to flee ISIS-controlled territory. In doing so, he was captured by YPG forces. That was over two and a half years ago. Now:

1
Jack has been imprisoned in northern Syria since May 2017 in harsh conditions. When he was last able to communicate directly with his parents in July 2017 he was not allowed to leave his cell at all.
2
Jack has never been involved in violence and the British police have told his parents there is no evidence that he has done anything wrong.
3
Jack stood against ISIS while in Syria, and has publicly said he ‘hates them more than the Americans hate them.’ He was imprisoned by ISIS several times, and lived in hiding from them for two years.
4
Jack says he’s never had a gun in his life, and has never been a fighter.
5
No ‘secret intelligence information’ exists to link Jack to terrorism in any way.
6
Jack was a dual British/Canadian citizen, however both countries have thrown their hands up in the air, saying ‘he’s not our problem.’.
7
The initial story of ‘Jihadi Jack’ was invented by the Sunday Times journalist and Islamophobe, Richard Kerbaj, who lied about Jack joining ISIS. Jack’s parents challenge Kerbaj to produce the tape or his source for this lie, which has libeled his parents and threatened Jack’s life.
8
Jack’s parents are desperate to bring Jack back home and out of harm’s way, but their appeals to British justice, morality, international law, reason, humanitarian law, ‘innocent until proven guilty’ have fallen on deaf ears.
9
By sending money to help Jack get out of Syria, Jack’s parents themselves were charged with ‘supporting terrorism’, even though the police gave them permission to send the funds. (It is important to note, that they were found NOT GUILTY of two charges of supporting terrorism. They were only found guilty of one charge for sending £223 to a contact of Jack’s in Lebanon because they ‘should have had reasonable cause to suspect that it might fall into the wrong hands’.)

Jack was told in May 2017 that the Kurdish authorities wanted to hand him over to the British. However, the British government told Jack’s parents that they cannot help secure Jack’s release as they do not have any consular access in northern Syria.

The government believes public opinion is led by a media that promotes the idea that everyone who goes to Syria is a ‘terrorist’, and believes it has the support of the public in keeping Jack in detention, but hundreds of messages from friends, teachers, and political and religious leaders say otherwise. If you agree that Jack’s unlawful detention and his abandonment by the governments of the countries of his citizenship is a travesty of justice, please stand with the Letts family and add your signature to this open letter:

My brother used to go to school with jack, he used to come to our house and is such a lovely and kind boy. I know he would never have knowingly got himself into this he has been misguided and deceived by some truly evil people. I would love to do anything I can to help

Namrah Z. – United Kingdom

This is a young man who needs help , let us not sit on our hands and pretend that it does not relate to us, he could be our child, brother or friend.

sohani h. – United Kingdom